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Author Topic: Physic Lectures P1-7 by Richard Feynman - Cornell University  (Read 5190 times)

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Offline ToRead

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Re: Physic Lectures P1-7 by Richard Feynman - Cornell University
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2013, 01:24:39 PM »
Interesting ...  :megane:

Offline woadwabbit

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Re: Physic Lectures P1-7 by Richard Feynman - Cornell University
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2011, 09:45:04 AM »
YESSSSSS! Though this is old news, I really do wish people would take more notice of the huge implications Web 2.0 poses. This is the tip of the iceburg, but (as the above poster also said) kudos to Gates!

These lectures are truly inspiring, and are indelible for both newcomers and oldtimers to physics!

Offline Acce

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Re: Physic Lectures P1-7 by Richard Feynman - Cornell University
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2010, 11:19:19 PM »
I so have to watch these, thanks a bunch!
Even though I've never liked Microsoft much, I always liked Bill somehow. Cheers to Bill for doing this.

Offline silverado

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Physic Lectures P1-7 by Richard Feynman - Cornell University
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2010, 06:11:16 PM »


Be aware, those are real length lectures, so take your time watching them!

Lecture 1: Law of gravitation - an example of physical law
Lecture 2: The relation of mathematics and physics
Lecture 3: The great conservation principles
Lecture 4: Symmetry in physical law
Lecture 5: The distinction of past and future
Lecture 6: Probability and uncertainty - The quantum mechanical view of nature
Lecture 7: Seeking new laws

Watch the lectures here: http://research.microsoft.com/apps/tools/tuva/index.html

Forget Windows 7, the most useful thing that Microsoft will do this year is host the videos of a famous lecture series given by Nobel prize winning physicist Richard Feynman back in 1964, so anyone can watch them and see a brilliant man engaged with the workings of the physical world and the people he is trying to get hooked on physics.

When you are Bill Gates, the richest man in the world, you can own just about anything that you want. And as it turns out, Gates owns the rights to the seven-part lecture series given by Feynman at Cornell University in 1964.

The lectures, which will be hosted by Microsoft Research here under the name Project Tuva, after the central Asian republic that Feynman was trying to get to when he died of cancer in 1988, are lectures that the physicist gave just before he was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics - along with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga - for cracking some pesky problems in quantum electrodynamics.

The BBC filmed the Cornell lectures, known as the Messenger Series, and Gates recently bought the rights to them with the intent of making them available free to the public, as a means of making science interesting.

"No one was more adept at making science fun and interesting than Richard Feynman," Gates said in a statement announcing that the lectures are now available for free. "More than 20 years after first seeing them, these are still some of the best science lectures I've heard. Feynman worked hard during his life to popularize science, so I'm sure he'd be thrilled that now anyone, anywhere in the world, can just click a button and experience his lectures."

Well, almost anyone. This being Microsoft, you have to install its Silverlight plug-in to view the lectures.

Seeing as though Gates has so much money available to do such things, it is a pity that he can't build a time machine and go back and have the Beeb film Feynman's December 1959 lecture at an American Physical Society meeting hosted by Caltech (where Feynman was working at the time) called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.

This lecture has been credited by some (and discredited by others) as being the stimulus that started people thinking about nanotechnology. You can read a transcript of that lecture here. There is apparently a video of a follow-on lecture that Feynman gave, called Infinitesimal Machinery. Maybe Bill G can find and buy that, too.

Update: This story has been editing to show that you don't need Internet Explorer to view the lectures. You can use Silverlight from inside other browsers.

Be aware, those are real length lectures, so take your time watching them!

Watch his lecture 1-7 here: http://research.microsoft.com/apps/tools/tuva/index.html