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Author Topic: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn  (Read 4275 times)

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Offline Madking

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2012, 05:18:29 AM »
Very good guide. I used to have a very difficult time studying, but now i use alot of these techniques. Thanks alot!

Offline itidus20

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2011, 03:25:07 PM »
from wikipedia:
Subvocalizing is an inherent part of reading and understanding a word, and micro-muscle tests suggest that subvocalizing is impossible to permanently eliminate. Attempting to stop subvocalizing is potentially harmful to comprehension, learning, and memory. At the more powerful reading rates (100-300 words per minute), subvocalizing can be used to improve comprehension.

reference:Rayner, Keith and Pollatsek, Alexander (1994) The Psychology of Reading

Offline silverado

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2011, 03:58:54 AM »
Try speedreading this:

Sorry, please read the forum rules to see why you can't view spoilers and why you can't post in this forum section. Thank you!

Offline neko-chan

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2011, 11:51:00 PM »
^Speedreading works only for low content, low abstraction level texts. The kind you find in prosa, literature etc. Doesn't work for text where your brain hasn't understood the abstract ideas.
for the literatures of my final thesis this "speedreading" was effective. i could really fast get what the author wanted to describe in his article. i think speedreading depends more on your general reading velocity. when you can read a book of thousand pages in two days, you surely can read science articles up to ten pages in some minutes.

also i think it depend very much of your general knowledge. when you know many basic principles of science or historic facts etc. you can get the deeper meaning of some articles faster as when you have to get the basic knowledge out of the article.

Offline silverado

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2011, 05:27:07 PM »
^Speedreading works only for low content, low abstraction level texts. The kind you find in prosa, literature etc. Doesn't work for text where your brain hasn't understood the abstract ideas.

Offline onestar

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2011, 05:16:39 PM »
I'm just curious - as a person who has struggled with this sort of thing from a young age (namely concentrating on something enough to have it sink in), what prompted you to just kinda...learn random facts? Very cool by the way.

My English teacher in college taught me a way to read text in a much more efficient way - a sort of "looping" technique. As your eyes move along the text, sort of look at every other word or so. Essentially what you get is a series of semi-circles, forming a chain under the words, sort of grouping them together. Rather than perceiving it as a straight line made of individual words, the looping idea allows you to read phrases (another take on the 'bigger picture' idea). Its almost like reading in cursive rather than print; more flow-y. Its sort of hard to explain in text, ironically. Give it a shot, you might like it. This helps me understand anything I need to read for school with less strain.

Offline antonus

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2011, 03:41:48 AM »
Very interesting, I will have to read up on it. Thanks for the plug. :yay:

Offline silverado

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 05:11:23 AM »
Ah, hello! Finally a brain hack mate. If you have a cool SRS write about it! I also use my own SRS program to learn complex topics.

Offline blackred

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011, 05:02:05 AM »
I know this thread is really old, but since it's on the first page I thought I'd write about this. Looks like brain hacks aren't the most popular thing here :(


Rather than "scanning" through your textbooks, may I suggest a slightly different approach that has really helped me?

The first time you go through the book, dog ear the pages that you find most useful (don't mark them, the reselling value goes down, and it looks quite bad). Then, the next time you're going to read the book, read only the marked pages, and input the sentences into an SRS software (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition_system).

It perfectly fits the system you mentioned, with the added benefit that SRS works so well when timeboxing... A few minutes here, a few minutes there, and soon you'll realize you learned something without even "studying".  Plus, there are even web based services such as Supermemo that let you upload your flashcards to the web.


I could really write a whole guide about SRSing if someone's interested... This thing is so helpful it's scary.

Offline silverado

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2010, 04:09:03 AM »
Here is an example for learning the kanji for 飛 = fly/jump.


Offline St3alth

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2010, 03:43:51 AM »
Good techniques, "connecting facts" works fine with kanji to me.
Thanks silverado. o/

Offline rakschas

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2010, 10:33:44 AM »
im new to the forums, i kind of registered for Sakuranbo Syndrome but wow this forum section is even more my thing. really interesting stuff, thanks for putting it together.

 :banzai:

Offline BlockHead

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2010, 06:12:20 AM »
that's one good point!
I would add the practice act!
Sometimes real experience can brough back what you learn any time in your life.
Like plugin your fingers in the toaster, to know that its dangerous.
Or learn the phys of lighting arch by putting a forck int the microwaves oven...

Offline neko-chan

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2010, 06:19:02 AM »
i usually learn easily by hearing or reading something. never had any problems with that exept the times in school where didn't want to learn ^^;
for my mechanigal engineer i hardly studied anything before my exams. compared to others who studied weeks before the exam O.o;

Offline Maho0o

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2010, 09:46:06 AM »
Thanks for that very good explanation of you'res nukumi but I'm also studying Japanese for some time now (thought I had left the kanji thing apart till now) so I knew about this  :hahaha:

Offline nukumi

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2010, 09:30:08 AM »
for kanji (Japanese) : I recommend making a story for them. I know the Remembering The Kanji program uses that. For instance, I have these kanji card flashcards I used to use, but it breaks all the kanji down into smaller parts.

銅(copper) is made up of 金(gold) and 同(same).
Now you have to get creative.

Copper may look the same as gold, but don't try to pass your copper off as gold!
Sorry, please read the forum rules to see why you can't view spoilers and why you can't post in this forum section. Thank you!

If you make the story interesting enough, you won't ever forget it again. :D

Be warned though, not all of them work (usually radicals). If you can't break it into parts, like 飛(fly/jump), you have to find some kind of picture in it, sort of like looking at clouds and seeing pictures in them.
Sorry, please read the forum rules to see why you can't view spoilers and why you can't post in this forum section. Thank you!

Just squint at it a lot, or get drunk first and then decide what it looks like. To me, 飛 kinda looks like it has wings on the right side, so it reminds me of flying.

-=-=-=-
Nice topic though. I spent about 3 months getting my mom to understand the whole "connecting ideas" versus "learning 1 by 1" thing. It really helps, and you recall them much better later on too. :D

Offline silverado

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2010, 12:05:21 AM »
There are different compression algorithms for memory. That's what mnemonics is about. You convert figures into words which can be formed into images, thus reduced the amount of new information.

Read my other articles.

Offline Maho0o

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Re: Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2010, 11:55:38 PM »
Right, my problem really lies in the "Compress Information" part.... since I remember most of what we have to learn in history, phylosphi etc.... but when I have to learn my kanjis.... >.<
I just can't... I have to right 500 times the same thing, and even then I may forget it within a week!
any other advises silv?

Offline silverado

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Learning Techniques - 1. Learn To Learn
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2010, 09:53:07 PM »
Time spent studying does not equal learning.

More studying time won’t help if the way you are studying is flawed to begin with.

Holistic Learning
Smart people don’t just learn better. They learn differently. While many students get caught up in memorizing facts, intelligent learners know to seek the bigger picture and connect the facts together. This form of learning I call holistic learning.

Holistic learning is basically the opposite of rote memorization. Instead of reciting lists of facts, rules or formulas, you seek to connect ideas together. Instead of having separate boxes in your head for geometry, algebra or ancient India, you deliberately link facts together, so they form a bigger picture.

Excessive studying shows you aren't learning holistically. It shows that you didn't learn the material the first time. If you properly link ideas together to see the bigger picture, studying should only be a brief refresher.



How to Boost Your Study Habits
Holistic learning isn’t like a brainstorming technique or mind-mapping. It is fundamentally changing how you look at the process of learning and how you absorb information. As such, there isn't an easy ten step program to master it.

But there are some tools that can help you shift your learning habits so they become more holistic:

Visceralize
You’ve probably heard of visualizing, right? Visceralizing means taking all of your senses and connecting it to information. Studies have shown that people remember more vividly information that comes to us in an emotionally aroused state. Linking feelings, senses and imagery to bland ideas makes them more real. You probably counted on your fingers when learning numbers, why can't you do the same when you are learning now?





Metaphor
The heart of holistic learning is relating things together. Metaphors are literary devices that link two things that normally don’t go together. Come up with metaphors to describe more complicated ideas in simpler terms.





Ten Year Old Rule
Explain ideas to yourself as you would to a ten year old. Sure, this isn't always possible in your last years of a medical degree or learning how to apply neural networks to computer AI. But the idea is that you should be able to “dumb down” an idea enough so it seems obvious to yourself.





Trace Back
Put away your books and start with a random fact or concept. Then relate that idea to another concept in your subject. Keep doing this tracing pattern until you've linked many ideas together. The Gupta Dynasty reminds you of ancient Greece which reminds you of Socrates, reminding you of Confucius…





Refresher Scan
Scan through information in your text book. Notice whenever you encounter information that you either don’t remember or weren’t 100% sure about.



Scan a second time after 24h!
Quickly link that information back to existing ideas through viscerlization and metaphor.



Scan a third time after a week!
If your refresher scan is turning up more than a few points per chapter, you haven’t learned it thoroughly enough.

Remember, the secret number is THREE!





Compress Information
Not all information works well for holistic learning. A common point cited to me is learning anatomy for first year medical students. Anatomy involves learning arbitrary Latin names for hundreds of different elements of your body. There often aren't clear patterns and constructs, just a dry list of facts. When encountering information such as this, your goal should be to compress it.



Find ways to group information into smaller chunks of memory through pictures or mnemonics.





Write
Take a piece of paper and write out the connections in the information. Reorganize the information into different patterns. The key here is the writing, not the final product. So don't waste your time making a pretty picture. Scribble and use abbreviations to link the ideas together.