Funds $189 | Needed $160
Like the community? Enjoy reading manga?
Then click on the small donation banner! Thx!

125%

Author Topic: Long Term Memory Tips  (Read 2530 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline threb6

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Renommée: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2013, 01:34:59 PM »
I think I have heard of this technique, however in this over version, they mentioned that you do it for 1 day, then try to recall it and review it the next day, then try to recall it one week after and review it, then recall it one month later and review it. I guess it is similar to your version, but requires longer time before each review. I have never tried it before :huh:, so I plan on trying this technique when I go to Uni.

Thanks for the tips too!

Replied: January 11, 2013, 01:37:05 PM
Dam I just read your second post under the first, it basically recounted what I was told except some details were different. I shoulda read the entire thing before posting. :wahaha:

Offline Fauriza

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2013, 12:07:53 AM »
It's very hard to try, but i think its very imprtant

Offline JoelSmith

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2013, 07:37:50 PM »
I am a bit low on memory lately.These tips really work???
__________________________________________________
manuka honey

Offline seafoodjunkie

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Renommée: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2012, 01:23:29 PM »
does it actually work? frankly, my memory need a lot of work. will try it, though.

Offline OMGIMASIAN

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2012, 04:27:57 PM »
This will be really helpful, I'm taking the SAT soon, and i didn't study over the summer, Japan was a lot funner. Thanks

Offline Sethhhh

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2012, 02:19:18 PM »

Offline Magickage

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2012, 09:23:27 PM »
Hmm nice, I have a few tests do re-do in about a month so I'll definitely try this one out. I hope it's better than just sitting down and reading over the subject matter for hours anyway.

Offline yukioku

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
  • Grisia (Legend of Sun Knight): Life is about takin
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2012, 05:39:00 PM »
it's very useful, thanks for the great information

Offline xtudiux

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2012, 05:19:46 PM »
 :huh:

nice...will try this one...


Offline 1dbzfanjake

  • J-Starter
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Renommée: 0
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Long Term Memory Tips
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2011, 05:50:41 AM »
This is my first post, so sorry if I break a rule or something, but I don't think I am. This memory trick I use a lot and find it quite helpful. I got this idea from my tutor. Check out his website: studyhall.com

Step one: review your material carefully the first time. Look at differences and similarities between each fact. Spend about 10 minutes initially.
2. Come back 5 minutes later and try to recall everything you learned first. Then go back and review for 2 minutes.
3. Come back an hour later and recall the facts. Then check your answers and read the facts once again.
4. Step 2 but after 3 hours.
5. Step 2 but 6 hours later.

Do the same thing four times on Day 2 and 3 for only 3-4 minutes each time. After you are done, you should have it in your long term memory.

Sorry this isn't the whole sheet I got. My tutor's website is down right now but if you go to studyhall.com and click on memory tips, the tip mentioned above should be there with more tips and interesting tidbits. Thanks for reading. I'll post the other tips later.

Replied: April 12, 2011, 05:53:06 AM
Sorry my internet was down. Here's what I wanted to copy and paste into the post above:
The online program for SAT preparation provides memory improvement techniques. We specialize in providing brain memory training and other memory improvement programs and strategies, to help you improve memory skills and get better verbal and math scores.

Now first and foremost - BASIC MEMORY TECHNIQUES. 
With the case of our general memory - we receive some piece of information, we sense it, see it, feel it, read it, and it goes into our brain and it is stored in the short term memory. Now the trick is to move this information to the long term memory so that you are able to keep it longer than five or ten minutes.
The well known learning curve shows that in five minutes, much of the information we have taken in is lost. After an hour - two thirds of it is lost. And after a day has passed - 90 % of it is lost. This is the curve of forgetting. What we've found is that you can reverse that curve. And there are various techniques to do it.
The first thing we want to go over is how a simple recall method can help you store the information. Now this is information that we'll call ROTE INFORMATION for example when you are learning a section of a speech. In these cases you are learning something that is not just a list, that is not just something simple and direct. Its more of a instance of wanting to remember situations - wanting to remember broader terms.
For this we are going to use a little bit of ASSOCIATION but then we are going to base it primarily on MEMORY REVIEW. This works whether you are remembering lines of poetry or outlines of the sensory system.
First and foremost you want to ORGANIZE the information you are going to be taking in. You have to decide in what manner you want to take the information in. It may be by rote memorization of a section. It may well be some type of outline form.
The first step is to take in the information. And when you take in the information you really must learn to fully attend to what you are doing. Involve yourself in what your taking in. We use the phrase "Be where you are." Be truly focused.Incorporate as many of the senses as you can. In other words, write it down, see it, even say it out loud sometimes. The more senses involved enhance the memory process.


And now you can reverse the learning curve. This is the key point here. You can reverse the learning curve by RECALL. The number of times you recall something helps move that piece of information from your short term memory to your long term memory.
To point out a specific technique that works the best:
     Step number 1 - take in formation.
     Step number 2 - about five minutes later, go over the main points of what you are trying to remember, taking a minute.
     Step number 3 - an hour later, do the same thing.
     Step number 4 - three hours later, do the same thing. Just go back over the information a minute or two.
     Step number 5 - six hours later, do the same thing. That night before you go to sleep, review the material one last time.
     Step number 6 - repeat three times a day for the second and third days and you have that information for the long term.
Now to the student first taking this in sitting there saying, Man, I'm not going to do that. That six times the first day, two to three times the next day. My goodness, there's no way I'm going to do that. That's just a lot of work.


Baloney! Think about it. That's 12 times the first day. The second and third days, you only do it 6 times. That's eighteen, let's round it to twenty times. That's twenty times you are reviewing that information over three days for a minute or two. That means you are spending forty minutes studying that information, and you have it. And you know it, you possess it, and it isn't going anywhere. How many hours do people spend studying? Think about it. Typically, people sit down and study a subject for an hour or more to try to learn it. This is simply a more efficient way of doing it in a more piecemeal fashion. And by spreading it out over a period of days and recalling it more and more, you move it into that long term memory and it stays solidly there.
OK, that's where we are talking about memorizing, rote memorizing, where we are trying to take in broader or larger pieces of information.